NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Productivity of U.S. States Since 1880

Kris James Mitchener, Ian W. McLean

NBER Working Paper No. 9445
Issued in January 2003
NBER Program(s):   DAE

This study uses state-level variation in labor productivity levels at twenty-year intervals between 1880 and 1980 to examine the relative importance of institutional and geographical influences in explaining observed and persistent differences in standards of living over time and across regions. Focusing on fundamental rather than proximate influences, we find that both institutional characteristics and some physical geography characteristics account for a high proportion of the differences in state productivity levels: states with navigable waterways, a large minerals endowment, and no slaves in 1860, on average, had higher labor productivity levels throughout the sample period. However, we find little support for two other influences that have previously received attention climate and latitude.

download in pdf format
   (659 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (659 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Published: Mitchener, Kris James and Ian W. McLean. "The Productivity Of US States Since 1880," Journal of Economic Growth, 2003, v8(1,Mar), 73-114.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Kim w11206 Industrialization and Urbanization: Did the Steam Engine Contribute to the Growth of Cities in the United States?
Peri w15507 The Effect of Immigration on Productivity: Evidence from US States
Engerman and Sokoloff w9259 Factor Endowments, Inequality, and Paths of Development Among New World Economics
Rodrik, Subramanian, and Trebbi w9305 Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions over Geography and Integration in Economic Development
Lang and Stulz w4376 Tobin's Q, Corporate Diversification and Firm Performance
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us