NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Effect of High School Matriculation Awards: Evidence from Randomized Trials

Joshua D. Angrist, Victor Lavy

NBER Working Paper No. 9389
Issued in December 2002
NBER Program(s):   CH   LS   ED

In Israel, as in many other countries, a high school matriculation certificate is required by universities and some jobs. In spite of the certificate's value, Israeli society is marked by vast differences in matriculation rates by region and socioeconomic status. We attempted to increase the likelihood of matriculation among low-achieving students by offering substantial cash incentives in two demonstration programs. As a theoretical matter, cash incentives may be helpful if low-achieving students reduce investment in schooling because of high discount rates, part-time work, or face peer pressure not to study. A small pilot program selected individual students within schools for treatment, with treatment status determined by previous test scores and a partially randomized cutoff for low socioeconomic status. In a larger follow-up program, entire schools were randomly selected for treatment and the program operated with the cooperation of principals and teachers. The results suggest the Achievement Awards program that randomized treatment at the school level raised matriculation rates, while the student-based program did not.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w9389

Published: Angrist, Josh D. and Victor Lavy. “The Effect of High-Stakes High School Achievement Awards: Evidence from a Group-Randomized Trial." American Economic Review (September 2009).

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