NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Abortion Legalization and Adolescent Substance Use

Kerwin Kofi Charles, Melvin Stephens Jr.

NBER Working Paper No. 9193
Issued in September 2002
NBER Program(s):   HE

We assess whether in utero exposure to legalized abortion in the early 1970's affected individuals' propensities to use controlled substances as adolescents. We exploit the fact that some states legalized abortion before national legalization in 1973 to compare differences in substance use for adolescents across birth cohorts in different states. We find that persons exposed to early legalization were, on average, much less likely to use controlled substances. We also assess how substance use varies with state level birth rates and abortion ratios. Overall, our results suggest that legalization lowered substance use because of the selective use of abortion by relatively disadvantaged women.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w9193

Published: Charles, Kerwin Kofi and Melvin Stephens Jr. ÔÇťAbortion Legalization and Adolescent Substance." Journal of Law and Economics 49, 2 (October 2006): 481-505.

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