NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Path Dependence and the Origins of Cotton Textile Manufacturing in New England

Joshua L. Rosenbloom

NBER Working Paper No. 9182
Issued in September 2002
NBER Program(s):   DAE   ITI

During the first half of of the nineteenth century the United States emerged as a major producer of cotton textiles. This paper argues that the expansion of domestic textile production is best understood as a path- dependent process that was initiated by the proetction provided by the Embargo Act of 1807 and the War of 1812. This intial period of protected ended abruptly in 1815 with the conclusion of the war and the resumption of British imports, but the political climate had been irreversibly changed by the temporary expansion of the industry. After 1815 nascent manufacturers sought to protect the investments they had made by lobbying Congress. Their efforts had an important impact on the provisions concerning cotton textiles in the tariff bill of 1816, and during the 1820s manufacturers won increasingly strong protection, culminating in the passage of the Tariff of Abominations' in 1828.

download in pdf format
   (326 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (326 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w9182

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Mancall, Rosenbloom, and Weiss w12045 Exports and Slow Economic Growth in the Lower South Region, 1720-1800
Rosenbloom and Sundstrom w9857 The Decline and Rise of Interstate Migration in the United States: Evidence from the IPUMS, 1850-1990
Rosenbloom and Stutes w11482 Reexamining the Distribution of Wealth in 1870
Irwin and Temin w7825 The Antebellum Tariff on Cotton Textiles Revisited
Brambilla, Khandelwal, and Schott w13346 China's Experience Under the Multifiber Arrangement (MFA) and the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing (ATC)
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us