NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The New York School vs. the School of Paris: Who Really Made the Most Important Art After World War II?

David Galenson

NBER Working Paper No. 9149
Issued in September 2002
NBER Program(s):   LS

American historians of modern art routinely assume that after World War II New York replaced Paris as the center of the western art world. An analysis of the illustrations in French textbooks shows that French art scholars disagree: they rate Jean Dubuffet as the most important painter of the era, ahead of Jackson Pollock, and they consider Yves Klein's anthropometries of 1960 as the greatest contribution of a single year, in front of Andy Warhol's innovations in Pop Art. Yet the French texts also show that the French artists' practices and conceptions of art paralleled those of the Americans. Thus while French and American scholars disagree over the relative importance of their nations' artists, there is no disagreement that the most important art of the 1950s was produced by experimental seekers, and that of the 60s by conceptual finders.

download in pdf format
   (315 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (315 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w9149

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Galenson w12499 A Conceptual World: Why the Art of the Twentieth Century is So Different From the Art of All Earlier Centuries
Galenson w14005 The Globalization of Advanced Art in the Twentieth Century
Galenson w11899 The Greatest Artists of the Twentieth Century
Galenson w8549 Masterpieces and Markets: Why the Most Famous Modern Paintings Are Not by American Artists
Galenson w12599 You Cannot be Serious: The Conceptual Innovator as Trickster
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us