NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Effects of Subjective Survival on Retirement and Social Security Claiming

Michael D. Hurd, James P. Smith, Julie M. Zissimopoulos

NBER Working Paper No. 9140
Issued in September 2002
NBER Program(s):   AG   LS

According to the life-cycle model, mortality risk will influence both retirement and the desire to annuitize wealth. We estimate the effect of subjective survival probabilities on retirement and on the claiming of Social Security benefits because delayed claiming is equivalent to the purchase of additional Social Security annuities. We find that those with very low subjective probabilities of survival retire earlier and claim earlier than those with higher subjective probabilities, but the effects are not large. The great majority of workers claim as soon as they are eligible.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w9140

Published: Hurd, Michael D., James P. Smith and Julie M. Zissimopoulos. "The Effects Of Subjective Survival On Retirement And Social Security Claiming," Journal of Applied Econometrics, 2004, v19(6,Spec), 761-775. citation courtesy of

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