NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Exploring the Racial Gap in Infant Mortality Rates, 1920-1970

William J. Collins, Melissa A. Thomasson

NBER Working Paper No. 8836
Issued in March 2002
NBER Program(s):   CH   HE

This paper examines the racial gap in infant mortality rates from 1920 to 1970. Using state-level panel data with information on income, urbanization, women's education, and physicians per capita, we can account for a large portion of the racial gap in infant mortality rates between 1920 and 1945, but a smaller portion thereafter. We re-examine the post-war period in light of trends in birth weight, smoking, air pollution, breast-feeding, insurance, and hospital births.

download in pdf format
   (219 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

This paper is available as PDF (219 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w8836

Published: Collins, William J. and Melissa A. Thomasson. "The Declining Contribution Of Socioeconomic Disparities To The Racial Gap In Infant Mortality Rates, 1920-1970," Southern Economic Journal, 2004, v70(4,Apr), 746-776.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Corman, Joyce, and Grossman w2346 A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Strategies to Reduce Infant Mortality
Grossman and Jacobowitz w0615 Variations in Infant Mortality Rates among Counties in the United States: The Roles of Social Policies and Programs
Haines w16133 Inequality and Infant and Childhood Mortality in the United States in the Twentieth Century
Acemoglu and Robinson w8831 Economic Backwardness in Political Perspective
Freeman and Schettkat w8797 Marketization of Production and the US-Europe Employment Gap
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us