NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Specialization and the Volume of Trade: Do the Data Obey the Laws?

James Harrigan

NBER Working Paper No. 8675
Issued in December 2001
NBER Program(s):   ITI

The core subjects of trade theory are the pattern and volume of trade: which goods are traded by which countries, and how much of those goods are traded. The first part of the paper discusses evidence on comparative advantage, with an emphasis on carefully connecting theory models to data analyses. The second part of the chapter first considers the theoretical foundations of the gravity model, and then reviews the small number of papers that have tried to test, rather than simply use, the implications of gravity. Both parts of the paper yield the same conclusion: we are still in the very early stages of empirically understanding specialization and the volume of trade, but the work that has been done can serve as a starting point for further research.

download in pdf format
   (720 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (720 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w8675

Published: Harrigan, James and Kwan Choi (eds.) The Handbook of International Trade. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2005.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Engerman and Sokoloff h0066 Factor Endowments: Institutions, and Differential Paths of Growth Among New World Economies: A View from Economic Historians of the United States
Deardorff Determinants of Bilateral Trade: Does Gravity Work in a Neoclassical World?
Engerman and Sokoloff w9259 Factor Endowments, Inequality, and Paths of Development Among New World Economics
Feldstein w6794 Social Security Pension Reform in China
Alesina and La Ferrara w10313 Ethnic Diversity and Economic Performance
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us