NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Catching Up with the Joneses: Heterogeneous Preferences and the Dynamics of Asset Prices

Yeung Lewis Chan, Leonid Kogan

NBER Working Paper No. 8607
Issued in November 2001
NBER Program(s):   AP

We analyze a general equilibrium exchange economy with a continuum of agents who have 'catching up with the Joneses' preferences and differ only with respect to the curvature of their utility functions. While individual risk aversion does not change over time, dynamic redistribution of wealth among the agents leads to countercyclical time variation in the Sharpe ratio of stock returns. We show that both the conditional risk premium and the return volatility are negatively related to the level of stock prices, as observed empirically. Therefore, our model exhibits many of the empirically observed properties of aggregate stock returns, e.g., patterns of autocorrelation in returns, the 'leverage effect' in return volatility and long-horizon return predictability. For comparison, otherwise similar representative agent economies with the same type of preferences exhibit counter-factual behavior, e.g., a constant Sharpe ratio of returns and procyclical risk premium and return volatility.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w8607

Published: Chan, Yeung Lewis and Leonid Kogan. "Catching Up With The Joneses: Heterogeneous Preferences And The Dynamics Of Asset Prices," Journal of Political Economy, 2002, v110(6,Dec), 1255-1285.

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