NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Why Public Schools Lose Teachers

Eric A. Hanushek, John F. Kain, Steven G. Rivkin

NBER Working Paper No. 8599
Issued in November 2001
NBER Program(s):   CH   LS   PE   ED

Many school districts experience difficulties attracting and retaining teachers, and the impending retirement of a substantial fraction of public school teachers raises the specter of severe shortages in some public schools. Schools in urban areas serving economically disadvantaged and minority students appear particularly vulnerable. This paper investigates those factors that affect the probabilities that teachers switch schools or exit the public schools entirely. The results indicate that teacher mobility is much more strongly related to characteristics of the students, particularly race and achievement, than to salary, although salary exerts a modest impact once compensating differentials are taken into account.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w8599

Published: Hanushek, Eric A., John F. Kain, and Steven G. Rivkin. “Why Public Schools Lose Teachers." Journal of Human Resources 39, 2 (Spring 2004): 326-354. citation courtesy of

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