NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Future of Social Security Pensions in Europe

Martin Feldstein

NBER Working Paper No. 8487
Issued in September 2001
NBER Program(s):   AG   PE

This paper discusses a possible solution to the double problem that faces European governments in dealing with the future of Social Security pensions. Like other governments around the world, they must deal with the rising cost of pensions that will result from the increasing life expectancy of the population. But the European governments have the extra problem that any solution must be compatible with a European Union labor market in which individuals from any member country are free to work anywhere within the European Union. The solution to this double problem that is developed in this paper combines an investment-based system of individual accounts with a 'notional defined contribution' system financed by pay-as-you-go taxes.

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Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w8487

Published:

  • Naar beste vermogen, Essays Honoring Pieter Korteweg, eds. JJ van Duijn, et. al., Kluwer, December 2001. ,
  • Feldstein, Martin, 2002. "The future of social security pensions in Europe," Journal of Financial Transformation, Capco Institute, vol. 5, pages 8-12.

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