NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Labor Market Impact of State-Level Anti-Discrimination Laws, 1940-1960

William J. Collins

NBER Working Paper No. 8310
Issued in May 2001
NBER Program(s):   DAE

By the time Congress passed the 1964 Civil Rights Act, 98 percent of non-southern blacks (40 percent of all blacks) were already covered by state-level 'fair employment' laws which prohibited labor market discrimination. This paper assesses the impact of fair employment legislation on black workers' income, unemployment, labor force participation, and occupational and industrial distributions relative to whites using a difference-in-difference-in-difference framework. In general, the fair employment laws adopted in the 1940s appear to have had larger effects than those adopted in the 1950s, and the laws had relatively small effects on the labor market outcomes of black men compared to those of black women.

download in pdf format
   (206 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (206 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w8310

Published: Collins, William J. "The Labor Market Impact Of State-Level Anti-Discrimination Laws, 1940-1960," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 2003, v56(2,Jan), 244-272. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Wold Model Construction and Evaluation When Theoretical Knowledge Is Scarce
Barberis, Boycko, Shleifer, and Tsukanova w5136 How Does Privatization Work? Evidence from the Russian Shops
Blanchflower and Oswald w6102 The Rising Well-Being of the Young
Jokisch and Kotlikoff w11858 Simulating the Dynamic Macroeconomic and Microeconomic Effects of the FairTax
Bekaert, Harvey, and Lundblad w7763 Emerging Equity Markets and Economic Development
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us