NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

International Business Cycles with Endogenous Incomplete Markets

Patrick J. Kehoe, Fabrizio Perri

NBER Working Paper No. 7870
Issued in September 2000
NBER Program(s):   EFG   IFM

Backus, Kehoe and Kydland (1992), Baxter and Crucini (1995) and Stockman and Tesar (1995) find two major discrepancies between standard international business cycle models with complete markets and the data: In the models, cross-country correlations are much higher for consumption than for output, while in the data the opposite is true; and cross-country correlations of employment and investment are negative, while in the data they are positive. This paper introduces a friction into a standard model that helps resolve these anomalies. The friction is that international loans are imperfectly enforceable; any country can renege on its debts and suffer the consequences for future borrowing. To solve for equilibrium in this economy with endogenous incomplete markets, the methods of Marcet and Marimon (1999) are extended. Incorporating the friction helps resolve the anomalies more than does exogenously restricting the assets that can be traded.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w7870

Published: Kehoe, Patrick J. and Fabrizio Perri. "International Business Cycles With Endogenous Incomplete Markets," Econometrica, 2002, v70(3,May), 907-928. citation courtesy of

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