NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Gold into Base Metals: Productivity Growth in the People's Republic of China during the Reform Period

Alwyn Young

NBER Working Paper No. 7856
Issued in August 2000
NBER Program(s):   EFG

With minimal sleight of hand, it is possible to transform the recent growth experience of the People's Republic of China from the extraordinary into the mundane. Systematic understatement of inflation by enterprises accounts for 2.5% growth per annum in the non-agricultural economy during the reform period (1978-1998). The usual suspects, i.e. rising participation rates, improvements in educational attainment, and the transfer of labour out of agriculture, account for most of the remainder. The productivity performance of the non-agricultural economy during the reform period is respectable, but not outstanding. To the degree that the reforms have improved efficiency, these gains may lie principally in agriculture.

download in pdf format
   (571 K)

email paper

A non-technical summary of this paper is available in the February 2001 NBER digest.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Digest by email.

This paper is available as PDF (571 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w7856

Published: Young, Alwyn. "The Razor's Edge: Distortions And Incremental Reform In The People's Republic Of China," Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2000, v115(4,Nov), 1091-1035.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Young A Tale of Two Cities: Factor Accumulation and Technical Change in Hong Kong and Singapore
Young w4680 The Tyranny of Numbers: Confronting the Statistical Realities of the East Asian Growth Experience
Young w7828 The Razor's Edge: Distortions and Incremental Reform in the People's Republic of China
Bosworth and Collins w12943 Accounting for Growth: Comparing China and India
Bai, Hsieh, and Qian w12755 The Return to Capital in China
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us