NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Demand for Medical Care in Urban China

H. Naci Mocan, Erdal Tekin, Jeffrey S. Zax

NBER Working Paper No. 7673
Issued in April 2000
NBER Program(s):   HE

This is the first paper to investigate the determinants of the demand for medical care in the People's Republic of China. It uses a data set that consists of detailed characteristics of 6407 urban households, a continuous measure of health care spending, and price. A two-part model and a discrete factor model are used in the estimation. Household characteristics and work conditions impact the demand for medical care. Income elasticity is around 0.3, indicating medical care is a necessity. Medical care demand is price inelastic, and price elasticity is larger in absolute value for poorer households.

download in pdf format
   (228 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w7673

Published: Mocan, H. Naci & Tekin, Erdal & Zax, Jeffrey S., 2004. "The Demand for Medical Care in Urban China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 289-304, February. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Grossman w7078 The Human Capital Model of the Demand for Health
Andersen and Bollerslev w6023 Answering the Critics: Yes, ARCH Models Do Provide Good Volatility Forecasts
Schwert w9277 Anomalies and Market Efficiency
Andersen, Bollerslev, Christoffersen, and Diebold w11069 Practical Volatility and Correlation Modeling for Financial Market Risk Management
Keller w6079 From Socialist Showcase to Mezzogiorno? Lessons on the Role of Technical Change from East Germany's Post-World War II Growth Performance
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us