NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Urban Development in the United States, 1690-1990

Sukkoo Kim

NBER Working Paper No. 7120
Issued in May 1999
NBER Program(s):   DAE

The United States transformed itself from a rural to an urban society over the last three centuries. After a century of unremarkable growth, the pace of urbanization was historically unprecedented between the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In the twentieth century, the urban population continued to increase but in a much more dispersed manner as the suburban population increased. Throughout these developments, cities also exhibited considerable variation in their population sizes. This paper find that the pace and pattern of U.S. urban development are explained by changes in regional comparative advantage and in economies in transportation and local public goods, which in turn were determined by the changes in the economic structures of cities. This paper also finds that cities varied considerably in size because the larger cities reduced market transaction costs associated with coordinating greater geographic division of labor.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w7120

Published: Kim, Sukko. "Urban Development In The United States, 1690-1990," Southern Economic Journal, 2000, v66(4,Apr), 855-880.

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