NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Does Where You Are Admitted Make a Difference? An Analysis of Medicare Data

Frank A. Sloan, Gabriel A. Picone, Donald H. Taylor, Jr., Shin-Yi Chou

NBER Working Paper No. 6896
Issued in January 1999
NBER Program(s):   HC

This study investigated whether the type of hospital in which a Medicare beneficiary is admitted for hip fracture, stroke, coronary heart disease, or congestive heart failure matters in terms of amount and timing of Medicare payments and survival. In total, government hospitals were the least expensive for Medicare, with major teaching hospitals being most expensive within 6 months of admission after the index even. Survival was best in major teaching hospitals. When considering payments subsequent to those for the initial hospitalization, Medicare spent more for patients admitted to for-profit hospitals than for those admitted to other non-teaching facilities survival. Payments on behalf of patients treated in for-profit hospitals were higher for Medicare Part B and home health, especially during the first two months following discharge from the initial hospital. Results of our research suggest that Medicare has a definite financial interest in where Medicare beneficiaries are admitted for their hospital care.

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Published: Does Where You Are Admitted Make a Difference? An Analysis of Medicare Data, Frank A. Sloan, Gabriel A. Picone, Donald H. Taylor, Jr., Shin-Yi Chou, in Frontiers in Health Policy Research, volume 2 (1999), MIT (p. 1 - 26)

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