NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Productivity Differences

Daron Acemoglu, Fabrizio Zilbotti

NBER Working Paper No. 6879
Issued in January 1999
NBER Program(s):   LS

Many technologies used by the LDCs are developed in the OECD economies, and as such are designed to make optimal use of the skills of these richer countries' workforces. Due to differences in the supply of skills, some of the tasks performed by skilled workers in the OECD economies will be carried out by unskilled workers in the LDCs. Since the technologies in these tasks are designed to be used by skilled workers, productivity in the LDCs will be low. Even when all countries have equal access to new technologies, this mismatch between skills and technology can lead to sizable differences in total factor productivity and output per worker. Our theory also suggests that productivity differences should be highest in medium-tech sectors, and that the trade regime and the degree of intellectual property right enforcement in the LDCs have an important effect on the direction of technical change and on productivity differences.

download in pdf format
   (2067 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (2067 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w6879

Published: Daron Acemoglu & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2001. "Productivity Differences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(2), pages 563-606, May.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Acemoglu w8287 Directed Technical Change
Hall and Jones w6564 Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Others?
Jones w17487 The Human Capital Stock: A Generalized Approach
Glaeser, Scheinkman, and Shleifer w5013 Economic Growth in a Cross-Section of Cities
Acemoglu w7800 Technical Change, Inequality, and the Labor Market
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us