NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Estimating Equilibrium Models of Local Jurisdictions

Dennis Epple, Holger Sieg

NBER Working Paper No. 6822
Issued in December 1998
NBER Program(s):   PE

Research over the past several years has led to development of models characterizing equilibrium in a system of local jurisdictions. An important insight from these models is that plausible single-crossing assumptions about preferences generate strong predictions about the equilibrium distribution of households across communities. To date predictions have not been subjected to formal empirical tests. The purpose of this paper is to provide an integrated approach for testing predictions from this class of models. We first test conditions for locational equilibrium implied by these models. In particular about the distribution of households by income across communities. We then test the models predictions about the relationships among locational equilibrium conditions and housing prices. By drawing inferences from a structural general equilibrium model approach of this paper offers a unified treatment of theory and empirical testing.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w6822

Published: Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 107, no. 4 (August 1999): 645-681.

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