NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Public School Segregation in Metropolitan Areas

Charles T. Clotfelter

NBER Working Paper No. 6779
Issued in November 1998
NBER Program(s):   PE

This paper presents measures of segregation in public schools for metropolitan areas. It shows that, not only are metropolitan areas very segregated, most of that segregation is due to racial disparities between districts rather than segregative patterns within districts. Metropolitan areas in the South and West tend to have larger districts, and thus feature less fragmentation by school district. Segregation at the metropolitan level appears to vary systematically with size, racial mix, and region. Because larger metropolitan areas tend to have more jurisdictions and exhibit greater differences in racial composition among jurisdictions, measured segregation rises with size, as measured by school enrollment.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w6779

Published: Clotfelter, Charles T. "Public School Segregation," Land Economics, 1999, v75(4,Nov), 487-504.

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