NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Does Special Education Raise Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities?

Eric A. Hanushek, John F. Kain, Steven G. Rivkin

NBER Working Paper No. 6690
Issued in August 1998
NBER Program(s):   CH

While special education has become a hotly debated issue of school policy, most of the discussion has centered on the aggregate costs of providing mandated programs for disabled children. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of such programs or possible interactions with the provision of regular education. This study, building on the unique data of the Harvard/UTD Texas Schools Project provides direct evidence on the effectiveness of special education programs. The average special education program boosts mathematics and reading achievement of special education students, particularly those classified as learning disabled, while not detracting from regular education students. These results are estimated quite precisely from models of fixed effects in achievement gains, and they are robust to a series of specification tests. At this stage, it is not possible to judge whether the program benefits are sufficiently large to justify the added spending involved.

download in pdf format
   (1623 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (1623 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w6690

Published: Hanushek, Eric A., John F. Kain and Steven G. Rivkin. "Inferring Program Effects For Special Populations: Does Special Education Raise Achievement For Students With Disabilities?," Review of Economics and Statistics, 2002, v84(4,Nov), 584-599.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Hanushek, Kain, and Rivkin w6691 Teachers, Schools, and Academic Achievement
Cullen and Rivkin The Role of Special Education in School Choice
Hanushek, Kain, and Rivkin w7082 Do Higher Salaries Buy Better Teachers?
Fryer w16850 Teacher Incentives and Student Achievement: Evidence from New York City Public Schools
Angrist, Dynarski, Kane, Pathak, and Walters w15740 Who Benefits from KIPP?
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us