NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Health Problems as Determinants of Retirement: Are Self-Rated Measures Endogenous?

Debra Sabatini Dwyer, Olivia S. Mitchell

NBER Working Paper No. 6503
Issued in April 1998
NBER Program(s):   AG   LS

We explore alternative measures of unobserved health status in order to identify effects of mental and physical capacity for work on older men's retirement. Traditional self-ratings of poor health are tested against more objectively measured instruments. Using the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), we find that health problems influence retirement plans more strongly than do economic variables. Specifically, men in poor overall health expected to retire one to two years earlier, an effect that persists after correcting for potential endogeneity of self-rated health problems. The effects of detailed health problems are also examined in depth.

download in pdf format
   (1022 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

This paper is available as PDF (1022 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w6503

Published: Journal of Health Economics, Vol. 18 (1999): 173-193. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
McGarry w9317 Health and Retirement: Do Changes in Health Affect Retirement Expectations?
Dave, Kelly, and Spasojevic w12123 The Effects of Retirement on Physical and Mental Health Outcomes
Bound, Schoenbaum, Stinebrickner, and Waidmann w6777 The Dynamic Effects of Health on the Labor Force Transitions of Older Workers
Baker, Stabile, and Deri w8419 What do Self-Reported, Objective, Measures of Health Measure?
Sickles and Taubman w1459 An Analysis of the Health and Retirement Status of the Elderly
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us