NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Costly Capital Reallocation and the Effects of Government Spending

Valerie A. Ramey, Matthew D. Shapiro

NBER Working Paper No. 6283 (Also Reprint No. r2225)
Issued in April 1999
NBER Program(s):   EFG

Changes in government spending often lead to significant shifts in demand across sectors. This paper analyzes the effects of sector-specific changes in government spending in a two-sector dynamic general equilibrium model in which the reallocation of capital across sectors is costly. The two-sector model leads to a richer array of possible responses of aggregate variables than the one-sector model. The empirical part of the paper estimates the effects of military buildups on a variety of macroeconomic variables using a new measure of military shocks. The behavior of macroeconomic aggregates is consistent with the predictions of a multi-sector neoclassical model. In particular, consumption, real product wages and manufacturing productivity fall in response to exogenous military buildups in the post-World War II United States.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w6283

Published: Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, vol. 48, 1998, pp. 1 145-194

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