NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Social Security and Retirement in France

Didier Blanchet, Louis-Paul Pele

NBER Working Paper No. 6214
Issued in October 1997
NBER Program(s):   AG   PE

Among numerous retirement schemes in France, the Social Security general regime" covers all wage earners from the private sector, about 65% of workers. In this regime are eligible for a full pension at 65, or between 60 and 65 if they contributed to the regime for at" least 37.5 years. For people between 60 and 65 who do not fulfill this condition still possible but with a downward adjustment of benefits. Our computations show that early" retirement adjustment rules give strong incentives to go on working until being eligible for a full" pension, even if mandatory complementary schemes soften incentives, especially for executives." These results are consistent with empirical hazard rates, showing two spikes at 60 and 65 with the change in the retirement age induced by the 1983 reform.

download in pdf format
   (1600 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

This paper is available as PDF (1600 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w6214

Published: Social Security and Retirement in France, Didier Blanchet, Louis-Paul Pele. in Social Security and Retirement around the World, Gruber and Wise. 1999

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Blanchet and Pele Social Security and Retirement in France
Boersch-Supan and Schnabel w6153 Social Security and Retirement in Germany
Feldstein w4021 The Effects of Tax-Based Saving Incentives on Government Revenue and National Saving
Farber and gowa w5005 Common Interests or Common Polities? Reinterpreting the Democratic Peace
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us