NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Does Acquisition of a GED Lead to More Training, Post-Secondary Education, and Military Service for School Dropouts?

Richard J. Murnane, John B. Willett, Kathryn Parker Boudett

NBER Working Paper No. 5992
Issued in April 1997
NBER Program(s):   LS

This paper uses longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine whether acquisition of a GED increases the probability that male and female school dropouts obtain training, post-secondary education, or military service. Random effects probit models are used to account for both the dichotomous nature of the dependent variables and non-zero correlations among error terms pertaining to different years of data for the same individual. We find that acquisition of a GED increases the probability that school dropouts obtain post-secondary education and the probability that they obtain non-company training, defined as training provided by government or by proprietary schools. However, it is still the case that the majority of GED recipients obtain no post-secondary education or training through the age of 26.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w5992

Published: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 51, no. 1 (October 1997): 100-116.

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