NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Institutions and Labor Reallocation

Giuseppe Bertola, Richard Rogerson

NBER Working Paper No. 5828
Issued in November 1996
NBER Program(s):   EFG

Despite stringent dismissal restrictions in most European countries, rates of job creation and destruction are remarkably similar across European and North American labor markets. This paper shows that relative-wage compression is conducive to higher employer-initiated job turnover, and argues that wagesetting institutions and job-security provisions differ across countries in ways that are both consistent with rough uniformity of job turnover statistics and readily explained by intuitive theoretical considerations. When viewed as a component of the mix of institutional differences in Europe and North America, European dismissal restrictions are essential to a proper interpretation of both similar patterns in job turnover and marked differences in unemployment flows.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w5828

Published: Bertola, Giuseppe & Rogerson, Richard. "Institutions and labor reallocation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 1147-1171, June 1997 citation courtesy of

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