NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Implicit Taxes from College Financial Aid

Andrew W. Dick, Aaron S. Edlin

NBER Working Paper No. 5316
Issued in October 1995
NBER Program(s):   PE

Families who heed the 'experts'' advice and save for their children's college education typically receive less financial aid. The variation in the net price of college functions as a large tax on savings. College financial aid also functions as an income tax. This paper estimates the size and determinants of these income and asset taxes. We find that the marginal income tax typically ranges from 2% to 16% and the marginal asset levy from somewhat under 10% to as high as 25%. If a typical family chooses to accumulate $100,000 in assets rather than consuming these resources, it loses financial aid worth $10,000-$20,000.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w5316

Published: The Journal of Public Economics, Vol. 65, no. 3 (September 1997): 295-322. citation courtesy of

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