NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Capital Income Taxation and Long Run Growth: New Perspectives

Assaf Razin, Chi-Wa Yuen

NBER Working Paper No. 5028 (Also Reprint No. r2050)
Issued in February 1995
NBER Program(s):   IFM   PE

We study the effects of capital income taxation on long run growth in an endogenous growth framework with two distinguishing features: endogenous population and international capital mobility. Endogenizing population growth introduces a new channel for taxes to affect economic growth and enables us to discriminate the effects of taxes on total versus per capita income growth. Allowing for capital mobility in the open economy, we show how the effects of taxes on population growth and income growth across countries will vary in specific ways, depending on the international income tax regimes and the relative preference bias of people towards the 'quantity' and 'quality' of children. The numerical results based on our calibrated model for the G-7 also indicate that, although the effects of liberalizing capital flows on long run growth may not be very sizable, the growth effects of changes in capital income tax rates can be tremendously magnified by cross-border capital flows and cross-border spillovers of policy effects.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w5028

Published: Journal of Public Economics, vol. 59, pp. 239-263, February 1996 citation courtesy of

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