NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Intertemporal Approach to the Current Account

Maurice Obstfeld, Kenneth Rogoff

NBER Working Paper No. 4893 (Also Reprint No. r2048)
Issued in October 1994
NBER Program(s):   IFM   ITI

The intertemporal approach views the current-account balance as the outcome of forward-looking dynamic saving and investment decisions. This paper, a chapter in the forthcoming third volume of the Handbook of International Economics, surveys the theory and empirical work on the intertemporal approach as it has developed since the early 1980s. After reviewing the basic one-good, representative- consumer model, the paper considers a series of extended models incorporating relative prices, complex demographic structures, consumer durables, asset-market incompleteness, and asymmetric information. We also present a variety of empirical evidence illustrating the usefulness of the intertemporal approach, and argue that intertemporal models provide a consistent and coherent foundation for open-economy policy analysis. As such, the intertemporal approach should supplant the expanded versions of the Mundell-Fleming IS-LM model that currently furnish the dominant paradigm used by central banks, finance ministries, and international economic agencies.

download in pdf format
   (855 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w4893

Published: Gene Grossman and Kenneth Rogoff, eds. Handbook of International Economicsvol 3, Amsterdam: North-Holland, Elsevior Press, 1995.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Edwards w10276 Thirty Years of Current Account Imbalances, Current Account Reversals and Sudden Stops
Sachs w0796 The Current Account in the Eacroeconomic Adjustment Process
Milesi Ferretti and Razin Current Account Reversals and Currency Crises: Empirical Regularities
Feldstein and Horioka w0310 Domestic Savings and International Capital Flows
Blanchard w12925 Current Account Deficits in Rich Countries
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us