NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Fall in Private Pension Coverage in the U.S.

David E. Bloom, Richard B. Freeman

NBER Working Paper No. 3973
Issued in January 1992
NBER Program(s):   AG   LS

This study documents the 1980s fall in pension coverage and shows that it was concentrated most heavily on men, especially on the young and less educated. We find evidence that changes in real earnings and deunionization account for a sizeable portion of the fall in pension coverage. By contrast, we find little evidence that pension coverage fell because of a twist away from pensions in the tradeoff between pensions and other forms of compensation. With the possible exception of changes in the tax deductibility of contributions to individual retirement accounts, we also find little evidence that pension coverage declined because of institutional changes that reduced the attractiveness of pensions to employees or employers.

download in pdf format
   (112 K)

download in djvu format
   (84 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

This paper is available as PDF (112 K) or DjVu (84 K) (Download viewer) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w3973

Published: Published as "The Fall in Private Pension Coverage in the United States", American Economic Review, Vol. 82, no. 2 (1992): 539-545.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Kotlikoff and Wise The Incentive Effects of Private Pension Plans
Kotlikoff and Smith Introduction to "Pensions in the American Economy"
Freeman Unions, Pensions, and Union Pension Funds
Schieber and Shoven w4665 The Consequences of Population Aging on Private Pension Fund Saving and Asset Markets
Papke w4199 Participation in and Contributions to 401(k) Pension Plans: Evidence om Plan Data
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us