NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Effects of Child Health on Marital Status

Hope Corman, Robert Kaestner

NBER Working Paper No. 3850
Issued in September 1991
NBER Program(s):   HE

The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence on the effect of child health on marital stability and family structure within an economic framework. We use the 1988 National Health Interview Survey's Child Health Supplement, with a sample of about 9,000 families to test whether having an unhealthy child decreases the mother's chance of being married, and whether it increases her chance of living in an extended family. Using two different measures of child health, we find that having an unhealthy child does decrease the mother's likelihood of being married. Our results are strongest for white women who were married at the time of the child's birth and for black women who were unmarried at that time. These results imply that children in poor health will, more likely, face obstacles beyond their illness, since they will also be more likely to suffer consequences of poverty and poor schooling outcomes which results when raised in a female headed household. The only mitigating factor is that, for white children, they will be more likely than healthy children to living in an extended family.

download in pdf format
   (400 K)

download in djvu format
   (289 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

This paper is available as PDF (400 K) or DjVu (289 K) (Download viewer) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Published: Demography, Volume 29, No. 3,Vol. 29, Aug., 1992 pp.389-408

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Reichman, Corman, and Noonan w9610 Effects of Child Health on Parents' Relationship Status
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us