NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Lump-Sums, Profit Sharing, and the Labor Costs in the Union Sector

Linda A. Bell, David Neumark

NBER Working Paper No. 3630
Issued in February 1991
NBER Program(s):   LS

This paper documents the increase in the use of lump-sum payments and profit sharing plans in union contracts in the 1980s, and evaluates the extent to which these innovations may have contributed to moderation in the growth of labor costs, and increased pay flexibility. We find evidence that lump-sum and profit sharing arrangements reduced labor cost growth at both the aggregate and firm level. But the evidence linking these plans to labor cost flexibility is mixed; although the evidence suggests that profit sharing plans may be associated with greater flexibility at the firm level, there is no evidence that lump-sum plans increase flexibility at either the firm or aggregate level.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w3630

Published: Linda A. Bell and David Neumark. "Lump-sum Payments and Profit-sharing Plans in the Union Sector of the United States Economy" The Economic Journal, Vol. 103, No. 418 (May, 1993), pp. 602-619

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