NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Formal Employee Training Programs and Their Impact on Labor Produc- tivity: Evidence from a Human Resources Survey

Ann P. Bartel

NBER Working Paper No. 3026
Issued in July 1989
NBER Program(s):   LS

Although economic models of training decisions are framed in terms of a company's calculation of the costs and benefits of such training, empirical work has never been able to test this model directly on company behavior. This paper utilizes a unique database to analyze the determinants of the variation in formal training across businesses and the impact of such training on labor productivity. Major findings are that large businesses, those introducing new technology end those who rely on internal promotions to fill vacancies are more likely to have formal training programs. Formal training is found to have a positive effect on labor productivity.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w3026

Published:

  • Market Failure in Training? New Economic Analysis and Evidence on Trainingof Adult Employees, ed. David Stern and Jozef Ritzen, Springer-Verlag 1991 ,
  • Bartel, Ann P. "Productivity Gains From The Implementation Of Employee Training Programs," Industrial Relations, 1994, v33(4), 411-425.

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