NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Risk, Uncertainty and Exchange Rates

Robert J. Hodrick

NBER Working Paper No. 2429 (Also Reprint No. r1284)
Issued in November 1987
NBER Program(s):   ITI   IFM

This paper explores a new direction for empirical models of exchange rate determination. The motivation arises from two well documented facts, the failure of log-linear empirical exchange rate models of the 1970's and the variability of risk premiums in the forward market. Rational maximizing models of economic behavior imply that changes in the conditional variances of exogenous processes, such as future monetary policies, future government spending, and future rates of income growth, can have a significant effect on risk premiums in the foreign exchange market and can induce conditional volatility of spot exchange rates. I examine theoretically how changes in these exogenous conditional variances affect the level of the current exchange rate, and I attempt to quantify the extent that this channel explains exchange rate volatility using autoregressive conditional heteroscedastic models.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w2429

Published: Journal of Monetary Economics, Vol. 23, No. 3, pp. 433-459, (May 1989). citation courtesy of

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