NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Long-Term Care, Wealth, and Health of the Disabled Elderly Living in the Community

Alan M. Garber

NBER Working Paper No. 2328
Issued in July 1987
NBER Program(s):   HE   AG

Providing and financing long-term care of the elderly are among the most challenging policy issues facing the aging American population. This study examines characteristics and selected measures of utilization in the population most likely to use long-term care. It investigates characteristics of a cohort of noninstitutionalized elderly Medicare recipients who were impaired in the performance of at least one basic activity. It describes their wealth, living arrangements, and health characteristics. Tobit regressions are presented that relate utilization of hospital services, paid home-health care, and unreimbursed home care to these factors. I find that the number of activity limitations increases with age, but that in this population, household income and value of home equity do not decrease with either the level of disability or with age. The determinants of home-health care utilization in this population are distinct from the factors that have been significant predictors of medical care utilization in other studies.

download in pdf format
   (761 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

This paper is available as PDF (761 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w2328

Published:

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
McKnight w10414 Home Care Reimbursement, Long-term Care Utilization, and Health Outcomes
Lakdawalla and Philipson w6980 Aging and the Growth of Long-Term Care
Pezzin, Pollak, and Schone w14328 Long-Term Care of the Disabled Elderly: Do Children Increase Caregiving by Spouses?
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us