NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Blind Tigers and Red-Tape Cocktails: Liquor Control and Homicide in Late-Nineteenth-Century South Carolina

Howard Bodenhorn

NBER Working Paper No. 22980
Issued in December 2016
NBER Program(s):Development of the American Economy, Law and Economics

In 1893 South Carolina prohibited the private manufacture, transportation, and sale of alcohol and established a state monopoly in wholesale and retail alcohol distribution. The combination of a market decline in the availability of alcohol, reduced variety, and monopoly pricing at state-operated outlets encouraged black markets in alcohol. Because black market participants tend to resort to extra-legal mechanisms for dispute resolution, including violence, one result of South Carolina’s alcohol restriction was an increase in homicide. A continuous-treatment difference-in-difference approach reveals that homicide rates increased by about 30 to 60 percent in counties that more vigorously enforced the law.

download in pdf format
   (738 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w22980

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Christensen and Miguel w22989 Transparency, Reproducibility, and the Credibility of Economics Research
Butcher, Park, and Piehl w23079 Comparing Apples to Oranges: Differences in Women’s and Men’s Incarceration and Sentencing Outcomes
de Quidt and Haushofer w22973 Depression for Economists
Miron and Zwiebel w3675 Alcohol Consumption During Prohibition
Bertrand, Pan, and Kamenica w19023 Gender Identity and Relative Income within Households
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us