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Market Potential and Global Growth over the Long Twentieth Century

David S. Jacks, Dennis Novy

NBER Working Paper No. 22736
Issued in October 2016, Revised in July 2018
NBER Program(s):Development of the American Economy, International Trade and Investment

We examine the evolution of market potential and its role in driving economic growth over the long twentieth century. Theoretically, we exploit a structural gravity model to derive a closed-form solution for a widely-used measure of market potential. We are thus able to express market potential as a function of directly observable and easily estimated variables. Empirically, we collect a large dataset on aggregate and bilateral trade flows as well as output for 51 countries. We find that market potential exhibits an upward trend across all regions of the world from the early 1930s and that this trend significantly deviates from the evolution of world GDP. Finally, using exogenous variation in trade-related distances to world markets, we demonstrate a significant causal role of market potential in driving global income growth over this period.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w22736

Published: David S. Jacks & Dennis Novy, 2018. "Market Potential and Global Growth over the Long Twentieth Century," Journal of International Economics, vol 114, pages 221-237.

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