NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Do Minimum Wage Increases Influence Worker Health?

Brady P. Horn, Joanna Catherine Maclean, Michael R. Strain

NBER Working Paper No. 22578
Issued in August 2016
NBER Program(s):Health Economics, Labor Studies

This study investigates whether minimum wage increases in the United States affect an important non-market outcome: worker health. To study this question, we use data on lesser-skilled workers from the 1993-2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Surveys coupled with differences-in-differences and triple-difference models. We find little evidence that minimum wage increases lead to improvements in overall worker health. In fact, we find some evidence that minimum wage increases may decrease some aspects of health, especially among unemployed male workers. We also find evidence that increases reduce mental strain among employed workers.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w22578

Published: Brady P. Horn & Johanna Catherine Maclean & Michael R. Strain, 2017. "DO MINIMUM WAGE INCREASES INFLUENCE WORKER HEALTH?," Economic Inquiry, . citation courtesy of

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