NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Identifying and Estimating Neighborhood Effects

Bryan S. Graham

NBER Working Paper No. 22575
Issued in August 2016
NBER Program(s):LS, PE, TWP

Residential segregation by race and income are enduring features of urban America. Understanding the effects of residential segregation on educational attainment, labor market outcomes, criminal activity and other outcomes has been a leading project of the social sciences for over half a century. This paper describes techniques for measuring the effects of neighborhood of residence on long run life outcomes.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w22575

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