NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
loading...

The Incidental Fertility Effects of School Condom Distribution Programs

Kasey S. Buckles, Daniel M. Hungerman

NBER Working Paper No. 22322
Issued in June 2016
NBER Program(s):Children, Health Economics

While the fertility effects of improving teenagers’ access to contraception are theoretically ambiguous, most empirical work has shown that access decreases teen fertility. In this paper, we consider the fertility effects of access to condoms—a method of contraception not considered in prior work. We exploit variation across counties and across time in teenagers’ exposure to condom distribution programs in schools. We find that access to condoms in schools increases teen fertility by about 10 percent. These effects are driven by communities where condoms are provided without mandated counseling.

download in pdf format
   (522 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w22322

Published: Kasey S. Buckles & Daniel M. Hungerman, 2018. "The Incidental Fertility Effects of School Condom Distribution Programs," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, vol 37(3), pages 464-492. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Lindo and Packham w21275 How Much Can Expanding Access to Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives Reduce Teen Birth Rates?
Bailey and Lindo w23465 Access and Use of Contraception and Its Effects on Women’s Outcomes in the U.S.
Lovenheim, Reback, and Wedenoja w22030 How Does Access to Health Care Affect Teen Fertility and High School Dropout Rates? Evidence from School-based Health Centers
Buckles and Hungerman w14573 Season of Birth and Later Outcomes: Old Questions, New Answers
Gallego, Malamud, and Pop-Eleches w23982 Parental Monitoring and Children's Internet Use: The Role of Information, Control, and Cues
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us