NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Economic Impossibilities for our Grandchildren?

Kevin Hjortshøj O'Rourke

NBER Working Paper No. 21807
Issued in December 2015
NBER Program(s):DAE

The paper looks at the development of the secular stagnation thesis, in the context of the economic history of the time. It explores some 19th century antecedents of the thesis, before turning to its interwar development. Not only Alvin Hansen, but Keynes and Hicks were involved in the conversations that led to Hansen's eventual statement of the thesis that we are familiar with. The argument made sense in the context of the interwar period, but more so in Britain than the US.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w21807

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