NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Divorce: What Does Learning Have to Do with It?

Ioana Marinescu

NBER Working Paper No. 21761
Issued in November 2015
NBER Program(s):Labor Studies

Learning about marriage quality has been proposed as a key mechanism for explaining how the probability of divorce evolves with marriage duration, and why people often cohabit before getting married. I develop four theoretical models of divorce, three of which include learning. I use data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation to test reduced form implications of these models. The data is inconsistent with models including a substantial amount of learning. On the other hand, the data is consistent with a model without any learning, but where marriage quality changes over time.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w21761

Published: Ioana Marinescu, 2016. "Divorce: What does learning have to do with it?," Labour Economics, vol 38(), pages 90-105. citation courtesy of

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