NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Immigration, Human Capital Formation and Endogenous Economic Growth

Isaac Ehrlich, Jinyoung Kim

NBER Working Paper No. 21699
Issued in November 2015, Revised in December 2015
NBER Program(s):Development Economics, Economic Fluctuations and Growth, , Labor Studies

Census data from international sources covering 77% of the world’s migrant population indicate that the skill composition of migrants in major destination countries, including the US, has been rising over the last 4 decades. Moreover, the population share of skilled migrants has been approaching or exceeding that of skilled natives. We offer theoretical propositions and empirical tests consistent with these trends via a general-equilibrium model of endogenous growth where human capital, population, income growth and distribution, and migration trends are endogenous. We derive new insights about the impact of migration on long-term income growth and distribution, and the net benefits to natives in both destination and source countries.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w21699

Published: Isaac Ehrlich & Jinyoung Kim, 2015. "Immigration, Human Capital Formation, and Endogenous Economic Growth," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(4), pages 518 - 563. citation courtesy of

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