NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Uncovered Interest Parity and Monetary Policy Near and Far from the Zero Lower Bound

Menzie D. Chinn, Yi Zhang

NBER Working Paper No. 21159
Issued in May 2015, Revised in May 2015
NBER Program(s):International Finance and Macroeconomics

Relying upon a standard New Keynesian DSGE, we propose an explanation for two empirical findings in the international finance literature. First, the unbiasedness hypothesis – the proposition that expost exchange rate depreciation matches interest differentials – is rejected much more strongly at short horizons than at long. Second, even at long horizons, the unbiasedness hypothesis tends to be rejected when one of the currencies has experienced a long period of low interest rates, such as in Japan and Switzerland. Using a calibrated New Keynesian dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model, we show how a monetary policy rule can induce the negative (positive) correlation between depreciation and interest differentials at short (long) horizons. The tendency to reject unbiasedness for Japan and Switzerland even at long horizons we attribute to the interaction of the monetary reaction function and the zero lower bound.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w21159

Published: Menzie D. Chinn & Yi Zhang, 2018. "Uncovered Interest Parity and Monetary Policy Near and Far from the Zero Lower Bound," Open Economies Review, vol 29(1), pages 1-30.

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