NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
loading...

The Nature of Conflict

Cemal Eren Arbatli, Quamrul H. Ashraf, Oded Galor

NBER Working Paper No. 21079
Issued in April 2015
NBER Program(s):Development Economics, Economic Fluctuations and Growth, Political Economy

This research establishes that the emergence, prevalence, recurrence, and severity of intrastate conflicts in the modern era reflect the long shadow of prehistory. Exploiting variations across national populations, it demonstrates that genetic diversity, as determined predominantly during the exodus of humans from Africa tens of thousands of years ago, has contributed significantly to the frequency, incidence, and onset of both overall and ethnic civil conflict over the last half-century, accounting for a large set of geographical and institutional correlates of conflict, as well as measures of economic development. Furthermore, the analysis establishes the significant contribution of genetic diversity to the intensity of social unrest and to the incidence of intragroup factional conflict. These findings arguably reflect the contribution of genetic diversity to the degree of fractionalization and polarization across ethnic, linguistic, and religious groups in the national population; the adverse influence of genetic diversity on interpersonal trust and cooperation; the contribution of genetic diversity to divergence in preferences for public goods and redistributive policies; and the potential impact of genetic diversity on economic inequality within a society.

download in pdf format
   (783 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w21079

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Aizenman, Jinjarak, and Park w20917 Financial Development and Output Growth in Developing Asia and Latin America: A Comparative Sectoral Analysis
McCaig, McMillan, Verduzco-Gallo, and Jefferis w21029 Stuck in the Middle? Structural Change and Productivity Growth in Botswana
Michalopoulos and Papaioannou w20513 On the Ethnic Origins of African Development Chiefs and Pre-colonial Political Centralization
Meyer and Mittag w20509 Misclassification in Binary Choice Models
Buera, Kaboski, and Shin w21107 Entrepreneurship and Financial Frictions: A Macro-Development Perspective
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us