The 9/11 Dust Cloud and Pregnancy Outcomes: A Reconsideration

Janet Currie, Hannes Schwandt

NBER Working Paper No. 20368
Issued in August 2014
NBER Program(s):   CH   HE

The events of 9/11 released a million tons of toxic dust into lower Manhattan, an unparalleled environmental disaster. It is puzzling then that the literature has shown little effect of fetal exposure to the dust. However, inference is complicated by pre-existing differences between the affected mothers and other NYC mothers as well as heterogeneity in effects on boys and girls. Using all births in utero on 9/11 in NYC and comparing them to their siblings, we show that residence in the affected area increased prematurity, low birth weight, and admission to the NICU after birth, especially for boys.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w20368

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