NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Youth Labor Market in the 80s: Determinants of Re-Employment Probabilities for Young Men and Women

Lisa M. Lynch

NBER Working Paper No. 2021
Issued in September 1986
NBER Program(s):   LS

This paper presents an analysis of the determinants of re-employment probabilities for young workers in the U.S. Using data from the new National Longitudinal Survey youth cohort a model is developed to analyze the transition probabilities from nonemployment to employment. The key factors examined include personal characteristics, unemployment income, local demand conditions, and duration dependence. There are significant differences between the labor market experiences of whites and nonwhites, and males and females. High school dropouts have many more difficulties in the labor market than those who remain in school longer and/or receive other types of training. Local demand conditions are a strong determinant of the duration of spells of nonemployment and there appears to be strong evidence of negative duration dependence in re-employment probabilities for both young males and young females.

download in pdf format
   (265 K)

download in djvu format
   (214 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (265 K) or DjVu (214 K) (Download viewer) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w2021

Published: Review of Economics and Statistics, vol. LXXI, no. 1, pp. 37-45, Feb. 1989.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Clark and Summers The Dynamics of Youth Unemployment
Freeman and Wise The Youth Labor Market Problem: Its Nature Causes and Consequences
Imbens and Lynch w4585 Re-Employment Probabilities over the Business Cycle
Rees and Gray Family Effects in Youth Employment
Leighton and Mincer w0378 Labor Turnover and Youth Unemployment
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us