NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Long Term Impact of Cash Transfers to Poor Families

Anna Aizer, Shari Eli, Joseph P. Ferrie, Adriana Lleras-Muney

NBER Working Paper No. 20103
Issued in May 2014
NBER Program(s):Children, Development of the American Economy, Economics of Education, Health Economics, Labor Studies, Public Economics

We estimate the long-run impact of cash transfers to poor families on children's longevity, educational attainment, nutritional status, and income in adulthood. To do so, we collected individual-level administrative records of applicants to the Mothers' Pension program--the first government-sponsored welfare program in the US (1911-1935) --and matched them to census, WWII and death records. Male children of accepted applicants lived one year longer than those of rejected mothers. Male children of accepted mothers received one-third more years of schooling, were less likely to be underweight, and had higher income in adulthood than children of rejected mothers.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w20103

Published: Aizer, Anna, Shari Eli, Joseph Ferrie, and Adriana Lleras-Muney. 2016. "The Long-Run Impact of Cash Transfers to Poor Families." American Economic Review, 106 (4): 935-71. DOI: 10.1257/aer.20140529

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