NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Household Demand for Low Carbon Public Policies: Evidence from California

Matthew J. Holian, Matthew E. Kahn

NBER Working Paper No. 19965
Issued in March 2014
NBER Program(s):   EEE   PE   POL

In recent years, Californians have voted on two key pieces of low carbon regulation. The resulting voting patterns provide an opportunity to examine the demand for carbon mitigation efforts. Household voting patterns are found to mirror the voting patterns by the U.S Congress on national carbon legislation. Political liberals and more educated voters favor such regulations while suburbanites tend to oppose such initiatives. Survey responses at the individual level are shown to predict the spatial variation in actual voting patterns and hence convergent validity for results obtained with stated preference data on voting markets.

You may purchase this paper on-line in .pdf format from SSRN.com ($5) for electronic delivery.

Information about Free Papers

You should expect a free download if you are a subscriber, a corporate associate of the NBER, a journalist, an employee of the U.S. federal government with a ".GOV" domain name, or a resident of nearly any developing country or transition economy.

If you usually get free papers at work/university but do not at home, you can either connect to your work VPN or proxy (if any) or elect to have a link to the paper emailed to your work email address below. The email address must be connected to a subscribing college, university, or other subscribing institution. Gmail and other free email addresses will not have access.

E-mail:

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w19965

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Bunten and Kahn w20018 The Impact of Emerging Climate Risks on Urban Real Estate Price Dynamics
Li, Kahn, and Nickelsburg w19964 Public Transit Bus Procurement: The Role of Energy Prices, Regulation and Federal Subsidies
Hallsworth, List, Metcalfe, and Vlaev w20007 The Behavioralist As Tax Collector: Using Natural Field Experiments to Enhance Tax Compliance
Allcott, Collard-Wexler, and O'Connell w19977 How Do Electricity Shortages Affect Productivity? Evidence from India
Ranson and Stavins w19824 Linkage of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Systems: Learning from Experience
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us