NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Argentina Paradox: Microexplanations and Macropuzzles

Alan M. Taylor

NBER Working Paper No. 19924
Issued in February 2014
NBER Program(s):   DAE   DEV   EFG   IFM

The economic history of Argentina presents one of the most dramatic examples of divergence in the modern era. What happened and why? This paper reviews the wide range of competing explanations in the literature and argues that, setting aside deeper social and political determinants, the various economic mechanisms in play defy the idea of a monocausal explanation.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w19924

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